Introducing Math and Science at an Early Age

Thursday - February 27, 2014

These fun ways to introduce math and science will delight your child

 

While you certainly don’t need to be teaching your 2-year-old about Einstein’s theory of relativity, there’s evidence to suggest that introducing basic concepts of math and science to your child at an early age can build interest in learning and encourage a more thorough understanding of the subjects.

 

The best way to introduce these subjects is subtly, through fun and engaging activities. Try some of these, for example:

·         Take to counting common objects. If your child frequently plays with blocks, take the effort to introduce concepts of counting, addition, and subtraction. Ask how many blocks are in a pile they’re playing with, then add a few more and ask them how many there are.

·         Encourage creative thinking. Ask your child basic questions about the natural world around them, such as how they think trees grow or why the clouds move the way they do. Even if their answers are far off, you’ll give them the chance to think abstractly about their surroundings.

·         Explain how basic physics work—in easy terms. Try explaining what gravity is, or how rainbows form. These questions will spark your child’s interest in the physical world and get them thinking about how science affects other things in their life.

 

The more consistent you are in gradually introducing new information to your child, the better he/she will be prepared for their education, and the more they’ll come to enjoy learning.

 

Make sure you catch up on the latest news and like Columbia Academy on Facebook and follow us on Twitter! 

While you certainly don’t need to be teaching your 2-year-old about Einstein’s theory of relativity, there’s evidence to suggest that introducing basic concepts of math and science to your child at an early age can build interest in learning and encourage a more thorough understanding of the subjects.

 

The best way to introduce these subjects is subtly, through fun and engaging activities. Try some of these, for example:

·         Take to counting common objects. If your child frequently plays with blocks, take the effort to introduce concepts of counting, addition, and subtraction. Ask how many blocks are in a pile they’re playing with, then add a few more and ask them how many there are.

·         Encourage creative thinking. Ask your child basic questions about the natural world around them, such as how they think trees grow or why the clouds move the way they do. Even if their answers are far off, you’ll give them the chance to think abstractly about their surroundings.

·         Explain how basic physics work—in easy terms. Try explaining what gravity is, or how rainbows form. These questions will spark your child’s interest in the physical world and get them thinking about how science affects other things in their life.

 

The more consistent you are in gradually introducing new information to your child, the better he/she will be prepared for their education, and the more they’ll come to enjoy learning.

 

Make sure you catch up on the latest news and like Columbia Academy on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

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