State Testing: Pros and Cons

Thursday - October 10, 2013

Preschools in Columbia MD generally do not have standardized testing, but it pays to think ahead

 

Child care in Columbia MD might be a little too soon to start worrying about standardized testing, but the increased attention placed on test performance is a significant issue in the education community. Standardized tests are usually implemented beginning in middle school and carrying through high school, and Columbia Academy knows it’s a hot issue for parents and legislators alike.

Standardized tests are not perfect, but they aren’t completely ridiculous either. Columbia Academy has compiled some of the biggest pros and cons of standardized state testing:

Pros:

·         There’s some level of standardized accountability to measure the effectiveness of educational institutions. This holds teachers and administrations at a certain standard of performance.

·         Standardized testing allows for a way to compare different schools across many districts.

·         Tests establish a groundwork for material that needs to be taught to all children.

·         Standardized testing is 100 percent objective, compared to classroom grades, which can have a subjective component.

·         Tests provide ample data to learn about socioeconomic trends and make improvements to school administration.

Cons:

·         Standardized tests do not always account for various peripheral factors that could impact a child’s test performance, such as test anxiety.

·         Tests limit teachers’ range of subject matter to only particular areas.

·         Tests measure a student’s performance rather than the level of a student’s improvement, warping the perception of academic performance.

·         Tests can create a very stressful environment for both teachers and students.

·         Standardized tests can be leveraged as a political tool rather than an objective measure of performance.

For more thoughts on issues facing the world of education and childhood development, don’t forget to like Columbia Academy on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

photo credit: dsevilla via photopin cc 

Child care in Columbia MD might be a little too soon to start worrying about standardized testing, but the increased attention placed on test performance is a significant issue in the education community. Standardized tests are usually implemented beginning in middle school and carrying through high school, and Columbia Academy knows it’s a hot issue for parents and legislators alike.

Standardized tests are not perfect, but they aren’t completely ridiculous either. Columbia Academy has compiled some of the biggest pros and cons of standardized state testing:

Pros:

·         There’s some level of standardized accountability to measure the effectiveness of educational institutions. This holds teachers and administrations at a certain standard of performance.

·         Standardized testing allows for a way to compare different schools across many districts.

·         Tests establish a groundwork for material that needs to be taught to all children.

·         Standardized testing is 100 percent objective, compared to classroom grades, which can have a subjective component.

·         Tests provide ample data to learn about socioeconomic trends and make improvements to school administration.

Cons:

·         Standardized tests do not always account for various peripheral factors that could impact a child’s test performance, such as test anxiety.

·         Tests limit teachers’ range of subject matter to only particular areas.

·         Tests measure a student’s performance rather than the level of a student’s improvement, warping the perception of academic performance.

·         Tests can create a very stressful environment for both teachers and students.

·         Standardized tests can be leveraged as a political tool rather than an objective measure of performance.

For more thoughts on issues facing the world of education and childhood development, don’t forget to like Columbia Academy on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

photo credit: dsevilla via photopin cc

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